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We respectfully acknowledge the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation, as the traditional caretakers of the land which is the Richmond Catholic Parish.

We acknowledge the Elders, past and present.

May we, too, be good stewards of this land.

Mass Time Changes

Peace AngelFrom Monday 09 April 2018, the 7:30am and 8:30am Masses will be suspended.

Please refer to our Mass Times page for details of other Masses.

Wherever I am PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 18 March 2018: Fifth Sunday of Lent

If a grain of wheat falls on the ground and dies, it yields a rich harvest

Wheat and sunAs our destination draws near, at the end of an important journey, we may well have mixed feelings. We look forward to arrival; but we may be uncertain and anxious about the outcome.

As we face the challenge of entering deeply into the climax of the Church’s year of faith - the commemoration of the Saviour’s PASCHAL MYSTERY – it is as if the liturgy of this last Sunday of our journey anticipates our mood and reassures us. The readings bring us some of the greatest texts of the Scriptures, texts which – as we stand among the Greek pilgrims who wanted to ‘see Jesus’ - help us, in the words of the gospel, to come to terms with ‘the kind of death Jesus was to die’.

The horror of the Saviour’s Cross is plainly stated: his ‘obedience’ to the Father’s will, according the letter to the Hebrews, is made with ‘prayer and entreaty, with loud cries and tears’. And John’s gospel tells us, ‘his soul was troubled’, as his fateful ‘hour’ approached – in which he was to give all, like ‘a wheat grain’ which ‘falls on the ground and dies’.

If he invites us to share this fate with him – ‘wherever I am, my servant will be there too’ – he also helps us to trust in his Father, as we face the ordeals of our personal lives...

Extract by John Thornhill sm - read more at The Emmaus Series | Image courtesy of Hermanoleon Clipart

Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (21 March)

We have seen the evil of racism in historical and current events. The Nazi persecution of Jews and attempt to eradicate them are among the greatest evils of last century. The perhaps lesser but still monstrous assaults on the Armenians, the Hutu and now the Rohingya are also fresh in mind. Hatred for particular racial groups can lead to appalling deeds on a massive scale.

Because hatred begins in prejudice, people who call out racism and point to its dangers do society a favour. Although they are often shouted down for their pains, the angry shouts directed at them are the tweets of canaries in the dark mine of popular prejudice.

To understand racism, however, it may be best to reserve the word for its worst examples. It is too heavy for indiscriminate use. It evokes images of Klu Klux Klan killings, of gas chambers and of mass graves. These are the endpoint of racism. Its beginnings lie in attitudes and words that breathe of prejudice and contempt but do not find violent expression. To call these things racist lumps together the monstrous and the regrettable. It makes for confusion and defensiveness in conversation, not for understanding and change of heart. Where it is confined to attitudes and wounding words it may be better to speak of racial prejudice than of racism.

Easy accusations of racism can also suggest that it can easily be isolated and dealt with. In practice many strands of experience and culture are associated with racial prejudice in its more mild and more extreme forms. It is best understood as the product of a network of relationships that lead us think the less of people who differ from us. When we meet or hear of people who are different we see first their race and only secondarily their face. Actually race can sometimes be a secondary factor even in racial prejudice. It can flow out of a deeper antipathy on religious or other sources of difference. These tangled threads need to be untangled and their complexity given full weight.

To understand racism we must study its ecology, reflecting on the interaction of different elements of experience and attitudes rather than looking for simple unitary causes. These include the experiences and responses in us that generate a free-flowing anger and resentment that seek for a target. They may also include the frustrations of inadequate education and difficulty in finding work, living in an environment that is marked by disadvantage, a history of prejudice passed down across generations, and hearing coded racial abuse from politicians and media. What seemed simple turns out to be rooted in a complex network of relationships, many marked by disadvantage. This is the world we see through the eyes of the people with whom we work at Jesuit Social Services.

The antidote to racism lies first in reflecting on our own heart and on the prejudices that cloud our minds, and cultivating a habit of welcoming difference as a gift not as a threat. That will make us first wonder instead of judging when we meet people who display racial prejudice.

Fr Andrew Hamilton SJ

 
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