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The way to happiness PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 17 February 2019: Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Jesus teaches the crowd the Beatitudes

Blessed.  Image courtesy of pexels.com...As we listen to this Gospel, the Beatitudes jar our sensibilities. Those who are poor, hungry, weeping, or persecuted are called blessed. This is, indeed, a Gospel of reversals. Those often thought to have been forgotten by God are called blessed. In the list of "woes", those whom we might ordinarily describe as blessed by God are warned about their peril. Riches, possessions, laughter, reputation... these are not things that we can depend upon as sources of eternal happiness. They not only fail to deliver on their promise; our misplaced trust in them will lead to our demise. The ultimate peril is in misidentifying the source of our eternal happiness...

Read more at Sunday Connection, Loyola Press, A Jesuit Ministry | Image courtesy of pexels.com

 
Following our Lord PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 10 February 2019: Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Jesus in the boatThey left everything and followed Him

...In today's Gospel, Jesus teaches from Simon's boat. Jesus turns to Simon and instructs him about where to lower the fishing nets. Simon and others have been fishing throughout the night and have not caught anything. Simon protests, claiming that such an effort would be futile. Simon ultimately obeys Jesus and lowers his nets into the deeper water as directed. Notice here that Peter calls Jesus by the title “master.” He already recognizes Jesus as a person of authority. They catch so many fish that the nets begin to tear; Jesus' presence has created abundance out of scarcity, just as it did at the wedding feast at Cana, which we heard at Mass just a few weeks ago.

Simon Peter becomes a follower of Jesus immediately. He calls Jesus “Lord”—the title given to Jesus after his Resurrection—and protests his worthiness to be in Jesus' presence. Today's Gospel, therefore, marks a turning point in the relationship between Jesus and Peter...

Read more at Sunday Connection, Loyola Press, A Jesuit Ministry | Image courtesy of HermanoLeon Clipart

 
The gift of prophecy PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 03 February 2019: Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

No prophet is accepted in his own native place

SynagogueThe theme of today’s liturgy is the role of the prophet. Prophets have always had an important place in the life of the Church. This comes as a surprise to most people – probably because they think of prophets as those who predict future events: something that rarely happened. Prophets are people who – because they are in tune with God – help us to see things as God sees them. They point out the way God is calling us to follow, and remind us of the future God has in store for those who trust in him. At Vatican II, it was recognized that the important contribution such people can make has been neglected in the life of the Church in recent centuries. Every healthy Christian community has its prophets; we should be grateful for them and open to what they have to contribute to our life together. As Vatican II has told us, we are all called - through our baptism - to share in Christ’s role as the Father’s great Prophet...

Extract by John Thornhill sm - read more at The Emmaus Series | Image courtesy of HermanoLeon Clipart

 
Fulfilled Scripture PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 27 January 2019: Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me

The Torah...The teaching of Jesus in the synagogue of Nazareth, concerning his fulfilment of Old Testament prophecies, and Luke’s emphasis upon the traditions of the community, remind us that the world’s great religious traditions venerate the writings and teachings that put them in touch with their past. A healthy community keeps alive the memory of what inspired its origins. The first reading from the chronicles of Nehemiah describes a moving moment in the reestablishment of the Jerusalem community, after return from the Exile. The common people, ignorant now of Israel’s traditions, are overwhelmed with concern when Ezra, the scribe, reads and explains for them the long neglected Book of the Law. They are reassured, however, being told that the joy brought by renewed observance of old Israel’s traditions will be their ‘stronghold’. How much more grateful and responsive should we be, as today’s renewal makes available to us the far superior treasures of the New Testament!

Extract by John Thornhill sm - read more at The Emmaus Series | Image courtesy of pixabay.com

 
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