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Trusting in a good God PDF Print E-mail

30 June 2013: Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Jesus sets his face to go to Jerusalem. 'I have set my face like flint' Isaiah 50:7, like the servant figure Jesus resolutely confronts his grim destiny. His status will not exempt him from treading the ordinary human path of suffering and death. While on his journey, a Samaritan village proves inhospitable to the messengers of Jesus. James and John propose a violent response to this inhospitality: "Why not call down fire from heaven to destroy the village?" Jesus distances himself from such a prophetic action. Violence is not his way to deal with inhospitality; Jesus will confront far more murderous inhospitality in Jerusalem. But he will reject responding violently to violence.

Following Jesus then meant following his itinerant lifestyle, his way of dressing and his argumentative life at the margins of society like certain cynical philosophers known in Palestine. The words of Epictetus, a cynic who lived shortly after Jesus (AD50-130), are famous: "Look at me, I have no city, no house, no goods not even a slave. I sleep on the ground. I have no wife or children, no palace, only the sky and the earth and a threadbare mantle. And what do I lack? Do I not live without suffering? Do I not live without fear? Am I not free? What is my attitude towards the people you fear or admire so much? Do I not treat them the same as slaves? Do those who see me, do not think they are seeing their king and lord?" When you think radically of Jesus' lifestyle that Jesus had literally nothing, he calls us to travel light!

While cynics base their self sufficiency on a simple life, Jesus taught his followers to trust God's solicitous love and each other's mutual acceptance.

Jesus trusts in a good God, father of all, a friend of life and they learn the Lord's Prayer and repeat it every day at the table with all classes of people.

The principal features of the cynical groups are self sufficiency, freedom, imperturbability and shamelessness. The exchange between Diogenes and Alexander the Great is well known. When the emperor offered him to grant one wish, Diogenes replied; "Yes, move your shadow, it's blocking out my sun".

 

Image source: www.turnbacktogod.com

A thank you and a welcome

As Richmond Parish we sincerely thank Sonia Starc for filling in so generously and kindly offering her service as Parish Secretary for the last 6 weeks - God speed! We cordially welcome our new Parish Secretary Antonella Spina this week.

"Being a Catholic and a Priest in Today's Australia"

Fr Frank Brennan sjMore than eighty people braved a very cold Melbourne evening to be present for the talk given by Fr Frank Brennan sj in St Ignatius' Hall on Friday 21 June 2013.  The topic Being a Catholic and a Priest in Today's Australia was presented from various standpoints, with examples from everyday life, from literature, from history and from personal experience.  The content was insightful and gave much food for thought.  Time was given for questions which were an added stimulus for reflection and ongoing conversation over a light supper, which was served at the end of the evening.

A popular sentiment expressed was for Fr Frank to come again!

Please download his talk below.

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Download this file (fr-frank-brennan-talk20130621.pdf)fr-frank-brennan-talk20130621.pdfBeing a Catholic and a Priest in Today's Australia, Fr Frank Brennan sj - 21 June 2013289 KbMon 01 Jul 2013 06:07 PM