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The prayer of a community PDF Print E-mail

28 July 2013: Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Ask, and it will be given to you

Brevity is the soul of wit. In 38 words Luke's version of the Lord's Prayer has changed history. The earliest Christians considered the Lord's Prayer the only one Jesus taught to nourish the life of his followers. As a group's way of praying, it expresses its relationship with God and its members in one faith. Thus the first Christians saw the 'Our Father' as the best sign of their identity as followers of Jesus.

Jesus tells the Father the two desires of his heart: Hallowed be your Name, Your kingdom come. Then the three cries of petition: Give us bread, forgive our debts and do not bring us to the time of test.

As a whole this prayer is the prayer of a community that knows it is a loved family of God, to whom, on its journey through life, it constantly turns in confidence and trust to receive those benefits that only God can give. The wonderful parable that follows leaps straight out of the village life of Palestine. Would the man who has gone to bed with his family, will not get up and give bread to his friend who knocks, how much more inconceivable it is that God would remain inactive when his community is in need.

Do we often not catch ourselves out imagining God as less-loving, less understanding than the best of our friends?

Feast of St James

The feast of St James will be celebrated on Sunday (28 July) at St James' Church, 162 Kent Street, Richmond.  All parishioners are invited to the 10:30am Mass and lunch afterwards

Feast of St Ignatius

St Ignatius Loyola whose feast we celebrate this Wednesday (31 July 2013) has this redefining understanding with the image of God through prayer. 'The goal of our life is to live with God forever. God who loves us, gave us life. Our own response of love allows God's life to flow into us without limit. All the things in this world are gifts from God, presented to us so that we can know God more easily and malne a return of love more readily. As a result we appreciate and use all these gifts of God in so far as they help us to develop as loving persons.'

Fr Celso Romanin SJ, Hawthorn Catholic Parish, shares the following reflection on the age and times of Ignatius Loyola, 1491-1556:


Ignatius was born in Azpeitia, in the Basque country north Spain in 1491.  It was a time for change for the world as it was known. Ferdinand and Isabella (1451-1504) had just freed Spain from the hold of the Moors, especially in the south. Columbus had just discovered a New World in 1492, which led to a great economic expansion and wealth.  Michelangelo (1475-1564) was forging new architecture and Leonardo Da Vinci (1S00s) inventing all kinds of things. Galileo (1554-1642) was soon to come on the scene with a new way of looking at reality. it was a time for discovery of a new world and a new world order, of new arts and literature, and of challenge to the traditional way of life and order. The world was emerging from what we now call a mediaeval time, where things were well established, where kings and princes and authorities in the church were seen to get their authority from God. The Baroque was emerging with its sumptuous architecture and wonderful paintings and sculptures, (Caravaggio 1598) It was a time for challenge, when Martin Luther posted his 95 theses at Wittenberg in 1517.