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A kingdom not of this world PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 25 November 2018: Our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of the Universe

You say that I am a king

Jesus Christ, King of the Universe...In his responses to Pilate’s questions, Jesus distinguishes his kingdom from the political powers of this world. King and kingdom may be appropriate terms for Jesus’ mission and promise, but only by analogy. Jesus is king, but not the kind of king we imagine or expect. He was certainly not the kind of king Pilate feared he might be.

Jesus refers to a kingdom that does not belong to this world. This has been mentioned earlier in John’s Gospel. Recall that in his prayer during the Last Supper discourse (see John 17:6-18), Jesus prayed for his disciples who are in the world but do not belong to the world. Yet like Jesus, they are sent into the world for the world’s salvation...

Read more at Sunday Connection, Loyola Press, A Jesuit Ministry | Image courtesy of turnbacktogod.com

 
My words will not pass away PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 18 November 2018: Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

He shall gather his elect from the four winds

Sky with clouds... today’s gospel reflects the outlook of a community that is finding a healthy balance. Though it speaks with certainty of the coming of the end, it acknowledges that ‘nobody knows’ when it will be fully manifest ‘but the Father’. Echoing the language of literature such as the prophecy of Daniel about the signs of the end, it nevertheless urges constant vigilance, lest believers be taken unawares – one of the themes of the preaching of Jesus. We know God’s final achievement has been realized in the Christ’s risen greatness; but we wait in faith and hope for our full sharing in all that Christ has promised. With Mark’s community, we place our trust – whatever lies ahead of us - in the one who said: ‘Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away’.

Extract by John Thornhill sm - read more at The Emmaus Series | Image courtesy of pexels.com

 

 
Giving your all PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 11 November 2018: Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

This poor widow has put more in than all who contributed

Widow's two coinsToday’s reading from Mark’s gospel reminds us what a great teacher Jesus was. The object lesson he gives, as he watches people making their donations, is one of the best remembered stories of the world’s religious traditions – the ‘widow’s mite’ has become proverbial. Mark sharpens the lesson by linking this incident with what Jesus has to say about ‘scribes’ who ‘swallow the property of widows while making a show of lengthy prayers’. The situation of widows was insecure. The ‘scribes’, so often mentioned in the gospels, were interpreters of the Law of old Israel – the lawyers of the day. They benefited as trustees for the estates of widows, and a reputation for piety could be good for business. Jesus’ words, of course, have a lesson for all of us – people who make a selfish show of their piety, instead of making it a ‘secret’ they share with their heavenly Father (Mt 5:6), give Christianity a bad name...

Extract by John Thornhill sm - read more at The Emmaus Series | Image courtesy of pixabay.com



 
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