• An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
Follow us on: Richmond Catholic Parish Google+
Under the care of the Jesuits
You are here: Home

Parish Bulletins

Bookmark & Share

We respectfully acknowledge the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation, as the traditional caretakers of the land which is the Richmond Catholic Parish.

We acknowledge the Elders, past and present.

May we, too, be good stewards of this land.

Commemorating the 150th year of St Ignatius' Church

St Ignatius' Church 150th Anniversary Commemorative book2017 marks 150 years since the building of St Ignatius' Church.  Our parish celebrated this occasion with a specially arranged Mass at 9:30am on Sunday 30 July 2017 with Fr Brian F McCoy SJ, Provincial, as main celebrant. Concelebrants included the priests of our parish - Fr Nguyễn Viết Huy SJ, Parish Priest, Fr Tro Tran Van SJ, and Fr Ferruccio Romanin SJ - and many other Jesuit priests.

At the Mass, one of our parishioners, Dr Therese Keogh shared a Reflection: 150th Anniversary of St Ignatius' Church.

It was wonderful to see many parishioners, especially past parishioners, at the Eucharistic Celebration and in the parish hall for morning tea afterwards. Thank you to all who joined us in making it a memorable day.

A photographic book to commemorate this historic church (cover seen at right), launched at the Sesquicentenary Mass, is now available to purchase at a special price for a limited time.

ORDER NOW

A wedding invitation PDF Print E-mail

Sunday 15 October 2017: Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Whomsoever you find invite to the wedding

Wedding banquetIn Luke’s account, Jesus responds to the remark of someone at table with him (‘Happy those who will share the meal in the kingdom of God’) beginning his parable, ‘There was a man who gave a great banquet’. Matthew takes up and develops the theme of joy and celebration essential to Christian faith implied in this beginning, and opens the parable, ‘The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a feast for his son’s wedding’. The espousal theme was fundamental to the biblical tradition. The prophets compared God’s relationship with the chosen people with that of a loving and faithful husband. For the first Christians, the Saviour was ‘the Bridegroom’ (Mk 2:20), and the life they shared in the Church was described as joining in ‘the wedding feast of the Lamb’ (Rev 19:9). A banquet - especially that which celebrates a wedding - is an outstanding moment of fellowship. In the traditions of Israel, familiar to Matthew’s community, the blessings promised by God to those who have been faithful were likened to sharing in a banquet at the Lord’s table – as we hear in the reading from Isaiah in today’s liturgy...

Extract by John Thornhill sm - read more at The Emmaus Series | Image courtesy of Hermanoleon Clipart

 

Eradication of Poverty Day – 17 October

We usually think of poverty as something that afflicts third world nations. But it is also present in Australia - shamefully so, in a nation of great wealth. We can see its effects in the lives of Indigenous Australians, with their poorer life expectancy income and educational opportunities, and greater likelihood of addiction, hospitalisation and jailing. We see it also in the lives of homeless people, whether visible or forced to remain invisible in our cities, in the poor who can remain on benefits, and in the low level of benefits that make it impossible to live with decency.

At Jesuit Social Services we see the effects of poverty in the lives of vulnerable young people, often from dysfunctional families, lacking appropriate child care, support to take advantage of education and to find work, liable to physical and mental illness, lacking the social skills to connect with society and shamed by the conditions placed on the inadequate benefits open to them.

It is easy to say that the poor are always with us and to claim that that we cannot eradicate poverty. No doubt we shall never eradicate poverty totally, but poverty is neither natural, necessary nor inevitable. It is someone’s fault - the result of conscious decisions taken by human beings that result in some people increasing their already extreme wealth and in making other people vulnerable and excluded. Poverty grows when we attribute to our economic framework a sacred power and privilege economic growth over the welfare of people who are poor. It will be eradicated when we all see people as more important than an economic system designed for inequality.

Dealing with poverty demands that good people who are not poor take pains to notice it and accept the responsibility of addressing it. Pope Francis calls this process conversion. We are invited to see the world and the people in it through Christ’s eyes and with Christ’s heart. When we do this we notice what poverty does to people: the anxiety, the bad diet and problems with hygiene, the mental and physical ill-health, the lack of mobility to find jobs. We also see the inequality that exists alongside poverty and the ways in which people fight to defend the advantages that allows them to amass wealth. We see the ways that governments blame people for their poverty and humiliate them when they claim their inadequate benefits.

To make the world more just is a long and hard task. We can be discouraged when we see how tiny is our power to change things. The Eradication of Poverty Day encourages us to think and to speak about the causes of poverty. It is also important to light candles rather than curse the darkness. We might stop to chat with a homeless person instead of passing by, spend some of our time with the local Vinnies, or devote an evening to the soup van. These are small things. But they say to the people whom we meet that they matter. And because they matter we become a little more committed to eradicating poverty.

Fr Andrew Hamilton SJ

 
« StartPrev123456NextEnd »

Page 1 of 6